Most common idiomatic expressions in English

The English language is full of idiomatic expressions. While it is nearly impossible to learn all of these expressions, you should be familiar with the most important ones. Here is a list of the most widely used idiomatic expressions in English.

A penny for your thoughts

This expression is another way of asking what somebody is thinking.

Add insult to injury

To add insult to injury is to make a bad situation worse.

A hot potato

A hot potato is a topic or an issue that is widely discussed.

Once in a blue moon

If something happens once in a blue moon it happens very rarely.

Caught between two stools

When you are caught between two stools, you have difficulty choosing between two alternatives.

See eye to eye

When two people see eye to eye, they agree on something.

Hear it on the grapevine

To hear it on the grapevine is to hear a rumor.

Miss the boat

To miss the boat is to miss your chance at something.

Kill two birds with one stone

To kill two birds with one stone is to do two profitable things at the same time.

On the ball

When you are on the ball, you understand the situation very well.

Cut corners

To cut corners is to do something badly to save money.

Costs and arm and a leg

If something costs and arm and a leg, it is very expensive.

Sit on the fence

When you sit on the fence, you don’t make a decision.

This and other helpful information can be found on http://www.englishgrammar.org/category/writing/ 

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Active Vocabulary vs Passive Vocabulary

 

active vocabulary

VS.

passive vocabulary

 

The questions is…. How do YOU change Passive Vocab to Active Vocab?  Comment below and possibly be featured in a future post!

 

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Greetings

There are different ways to greet people:

Greeting means welcoming someone with particular words or a particular action.

When meeting people formally for the first time, we greet by shaking hands and saying “How do you do?” or “Pleased to meet you.”

“How do you do?” isn’t really a question, it just means “Hello”.

When young people meet informally they sometimes greet and say “Give me five!” and slap their hands together (high five).

Generally we do not greet by shaking hands with people we know well. We greet by just saying ‘hi’ or ‘hello’

Here are some expressions you can use to greet people.

Greeting

  • greetingHi, hello.
  • Good morning, good afternoon, good evening.
  • How are you?
  • How are you doing?
  • How do you do?

Responding to greeting

  • Hi, hello.
  • Good morning/Good afternoon/Good evening.
  • I’m fine thank you (thanks)/Okey! Thank you (thanks)/Can’t complain/Not bad.
  • How about you?/And you?
  • How do you do?

Things to remember about greeting:

When you greet someone and say:

How do you do?

this isn’t really a question, it just means “Hello”.

 

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